Tuesday, 13 June, 2017

In photos: Former Iranian Embassy in Washington

The Former Embassy of Iran in Washington, D.C. is located at 3003-3005 Massachusetts Avenue, in Washington, D.C.’s Embassy Row neighbourhood. The embassy closed in April 1980, when diplomatic relations were severed between the United States and Iran in the wake of the 1979 Iranian hostage crisis.

The embassy complex has not been used by the Iranian government since 1980 and its buildings and grounds are currently maintained by the U.S. Department of State

Iranian embassy maintains a clean facade in spite of having remained empty for much of 35 years. This is due to the efforts of the United States government, which is its official custodian. In 2011, US State Department provided essential repairs for the embassy, which was built in 1959, to ensure the safety of mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems.

This embassy is one of 11 properties owned by the Iranian government across the United States, all of which are now in U.S. government custody.

embassy05

Six of the properties are located in Washington, including the Iranian ambassador’s residence — a 44-room Georgian-style mansion built in 1934 located next door to the embassy.

The Shah of Iran attended numerous embassy functions there, and the last resident Ambassador was Ardeshir Zahedi.

Many stars visited the embassy including Elizabeth Taylor, Andy Warhol, Barbara Walters, and Frank Sinatra.

In 2013, Iranian artist Eric Parnes was the first person in over 34 years to photograph the interior of the embassy.

Currently, there is an Interests Section of the Islamic Republic of Iran in the United States which is located in the Pakistan Embassy in Washington, D.C.


Sources:

http://shahrefarang.com/en/former-iran-embassy/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Former_Embassy_of_Iran_in_Washington,_D.C.

http://iipdigital.usembassy.gov/st/english/article/2011/10/20111026102120enaj0.2352716.html#axzz1dZgOVQJ3

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